Writing



“As Israel turns 70, many young American Jews turn away”

The Los Angeles Times, May 6, 2018

"Natalie Portman , the Oscar-winning actress, recently kicked off a massive storm of controversy when she pulled out of a prestigious award ceremony in Israel because, she said, she "did not want to appear as endorsing Benjamin Netanyahu ." The response to Portman's refusal to appear alongside Israel's prime minister was intense. She was denounced by right-wing Israeli politicians. One labeled Portman's decision as borderline anti-Semitic. Another suggested that her Israeli citizenship should be stripped. Born in Israel, Portman is a dual American-Israeli citizen. "

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“Gaza’s nonviolent protesters exploited by Hamas, but feared by Israel,”

Salon, April 5, 2018.

"Last Friday was an important day for Christians and Jews around the world. For Christians, it was Good Friday, the day that commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus; and for Jews, it was the beginning of the Passover holiday, which commemorates their liberation from slavery and exodus from Egypt. Friday was also an important commemoration for Palestinians, called “Land Day.” It marks the date in 1976, when six Palestinian citizens of Israel were killed by Israeli security forces. Now future generations of Palestinians may well also remember Friday, March 30, 2018, as “Bloody Friday.” On this day, near the fence that separates the Gaza Strip from Israel, 18 Palestinians were shot and killed by Israeli soldiers. It was the highest Palestinian death toll since the 2014 war between Israel and Hamas, when more than 2,000 Palestinians were killed, most of them civilians."

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“American Jews and Israel: The End of ‘Israel, Right or Wrong’,”

Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, October 10, 2017.

"Although Jews make up just 2 percent of the United States population, they have exercised a disproportionate influence on the relationship between the United States and Israel. The strength of the U.S.-Israeli alliance is driven by numerous strategic, political, cultural, and economic factors, but American Jews have played a key role in the promotion and defense of the U.S.-Israel alliance in large part through the work of the pro-Israel lobby (represented by powerful groups like the American Israel Public Affairs Committee). Today, however, American Jewish political support for Israel can no longer be taken for granted, as growing numbers of American Jews become increasingly critical of Israel."

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“Young American Jews and Israel: Beyond Birthright and BDS”

Israel Studies, vol. 22, no. 3 (2017)

"The article examines the attitudes of young adult American Jews towards Israel and their views about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Drawing on the Pew Research Center’s 2013 survey of American Jews, the largest in more than a decade, as well as other empirical data, the article rejects the popular claim that young American Jews are emotionally detached and disconnected from Israel. Instead, the article argues that they are actually more engaged with Israel than their predecessors were, but that they are also more critical of Israeli government policies and feel more sympathetic towards the Palestinians than older American Jews. A number of reasons for these attitudes towards Israel are put forward, focusing on the political orientation, demographic composition, and formative experiences of this younger cohort of American Jews. In doing so, the article seeks to explain the generational differences between younger and older American Jews when it comes to Israel."

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"American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Part of the Problem or Part of the Solution?”

Political Science Quarterly, vol. 132, no. 2 (2017)

"In this article, I explore the role played by the American Jewish community—by far the largest,6 wealthiest, and most important Diaspora Jewish community—in the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinians."

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“Is There A Silver Lining To Increasing Anti-Semitism?”

The Forward, 2017

"As Jewish Community Centers across the United States recently celebrated Purim, seven more received anonymous bomb threats. Despite the normally cheerful Purim festivities, the prevailing mood among American Jews is grim. Whether or not they’re in a state of panic, as some commentators have debated, there’s undoubtedly widespread anxiety among American Jews today, after more than 150 bombs threats targeting JCCs, Jewish schools and other Jewish.."

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“How “Israelotry” became an American Religion”

The Atlantic, 2017

"The Six-Day War was a quasi-religious experience for many Jews, both in Israel and the Diaspora. The speed with which Israel vanquished its enemies, paralleling the biblical story of creation; its conquest of places sacred to the Jewish religion, especially Jerusalem and its holy sites; and the popular Jewish narrative of the war as one of deliverance from the brink of a second holocaust to a miraculous victory—"

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“Is Israeli Democracy in Danger?”

Current History (December 2016), vol. 115, no. 785.

"Israel has long proudly proclaimed itself to be the sole democracy in the Middle East, and its supporters around the world (especially in the United States) have touted its democratic values as a major reason to support the country against its authoritarian adversaries. Although it has always been a difficult balancing act for Israel to exist as both a democracy and a Jewish state—particularly given the presence of a Palestinian-Arab minority that makes up around 20 percent of the state’s citizens, and the heavy influence of Jewish religious law in its public life—it has largely succeeded in doing so, notwithstanding some glaring failures. (Most notably, the maintenance of military rule over its Arab minority from 1949 to 1966, and over Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip since 1967). "

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"Confederalism: A Third Way for Israel-Palestine"

co-authored with Dahlia Scheindlin The Washington Quarterly, 2016

"After years of wishful thinking and failed efforts at Israeli–Palestinian peacemaking, the Obama administration has now finally acknowledged what most observers have been saying for some time—there is no chance of a two-state solution to the conflict, at least in the next couple of years.1 Many now question whether such a solution will ever be possible. Although diplomats and experts have long regarded a two-state solution as the best way to resolve this most intractable..."

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“A Dangerous Divide: The Deterioration of Jewish-Palestinian Relations in Israel”

The Middle East Journal, 2012

"This article examines the relations between Jewish and Palestinian-Arab citizens of Israel since the events of October 2000, when massive Arab protests and riots took place and thirteen Arab demonstrators were killed. In the decade since then Arab-Jewish relations have been characterized by growing mutual mistrust, fear, and hostility. Together with these negative attitudes, political polarization between the two communities..."

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“Living with terror, not Living in Terror: The Impact of Chronic Terrorism on Israeli Society”

Perspectives on Terrorism, 2011

"This article discusses the impact of chronic terrorism on a targeted society by examining the case of Israeli society during the second Intifada. The Israeli case demonstrates both the extensive effects of repeated terrorist attacks and their limitations. The article argues that while Israelis were seriously affected by Palestinian terrorist attacks during the second Intifada, this did not result in major, lasting changes in Israeli behaviour. Despite being profoundly affected by terrorism, Israeli society was not demoralized by it, and in this respect Palestinian terrorism failed to achieve..."

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“Israel’s Palestinian Minority in the Two-State Solution: The Missing Dimension”

Middle East Policy, 2011

"The "two-state solution" to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has long been advocated by the international community (ever since the United Nations [UN] General Assembly passed Resolution 181 partitioning Palestine into two states, one Jewish and one Arab, on November 29, 1947), and actively promoted by successive U.S. administrations. It will not, however, solve the conflict. It will be, at best, an incomplete solution..."

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“The Israel Lobbies: A Survey of the Pro-Israel Community in the United States”

Israel Studies Forum, 2010

"The influence of the pro-Israel lobby in US foreign policymaking toward the Middle East has been a subject of great interest and fierce controversy in recent years. Yet, despite being the object of a massive amount of critical scrutiny, the pro-Israel lobby remains poorly understood. All too often it is depicted as a highly organized, cohesive political actor pursuing an agenda in line with, and even determined by, Israel’s right-wing Likud party. By undertaking a detailed empirical survey of the pro-Israel community in the United States, this article shows that such a view is grossly inaccurate. !e pro-Israel community..."

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“From Jerusalem to Baghdad? Israel and the War in Iraq”

International Studies Perspectives, 2009

"The prevailing opinion that the Bush administration took the United States to war against Iraq in March 2003 under false pretenses has led many to believe that Israel’s security was the secret rationale for the war. According to this “war for Israel” thesis, neoconservative policymakers in the Bush administration, the pro-Israel lobby in the United States, and Israel’s government all pushed the United States to go to war with Iraq for the sake of Israel’s security. This article critically assesses this controversial claim and examines Israel’s role in the U.S. decision to invade Iraq. I argued that while neoconservatives..."

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“Neither Ethnocracy nor Bi-Nationalism: In Search of the Middle Ground”

Israel Studies Forum, 2008

"This article examines the challenge posed to the future of Israel as a Jewish state by its Palestinian minority. In particular, it analyzes a series of documents published in 2006–2007 by political and intellectual leaders of the Palestinian community in Israel in which they called upon Israel to abandon its Jewish identity and recognize its Palestinian citizens as an indigenous national minority with collective rights. After discussing..."

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“From Controversy to Consensus: Cultural Conflict and the Israeli Debate Over Territorial Withdrawal”

Israel Studies, 2008

"The prevailing opinion that the Bush administration took the United States to war against Iraq in March 2003 under false pretenses has led many to believe that Israel’s security was the secret rationale for the war. According to this “war for Israel” thesis, neoconservative policymakers in the Bush administration, the pro-Israel lobby in the United States, and Israel’s government all pushed the United States to go to war with Iraq for the sake of Israel’s security. This article critically assesses this controversial claim and examines Israel’s role in the U.S. decision to invade Iraq. I argued that while neoconservatives..."

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“Ideological Change and Israel’s Disengagement from Gaza”

Political Science Quarterly, 2008

"The prevailing opinion that the Bush administration took the United States to war against Iraq in March 2003 under false pretenses has led many to believe that Israel’s security was the secret rationale for the war. According to this “war for Israel” thesis, neoconservative policymakers in the Bush administration, the pro-Israel lobby in the United States, and Israel’s government all pushed the United States to go to war with Iraq for the sake of Israel’s security. This article critically assesses this controversial claim and examines Israel’s role in the U.S. decision to invade Iraq. I argued that while neoconservatives..."

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“Losing Control? A Comparison of Majority-Minority Relations in Israel and Turkey”

Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 2007

"The prevailing opinion that the Bush administration took the United States to war against Iraq in March 2003 under false pretenses has led many to believe that Israel’s security was the secret rationale for the war. According to this “war for Israel” thesis, neoconservative policymakers in the Bush administration, the pro-Israel lobby in the United States, and Israel’s government all pushed the United States to go to war with Iraq for the sake of Israel’s security. This article critically assesses this controversial claim and examines Israel’s role in the U.S. decision to invade Iraq. I argued that while neoconservatives..."

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“Between Victory and Defeat: Israel after the War with Hizballah”

The Washington Quarterly, 2006-07

"The prevailing opinion that the Bush administration took the United States to war against Iraq in March 2003 under false pretenses has led many to believe that Israel’s security was the secret rationale for the war. According to this “war for Israel” thesis, neoconservative policymakers in the Bush administration, the pro-Israel lobby in the United States, and Israel’s government all pushed the United States to go to war with Iraq for the sake of Israel’s security. This article critically assesses this controversial claim and examines Israel’s role in the U.S. decision to invade Iraq. I argued that while neoconservatives..."

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“Israel’s Dilemma: Unity or Peace?”

Israel Affairs, 2006

"Ever since President Bush introduced his ‘Road Map’ for a permanent solution to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict in April 2003, a great deal of public attention has focused on its demand for a reformed Palestinian Authority (PA) to confront aggressively radical Palestinian groups such as Hamas and Islamic Jihad who violently oppose a two-state solution to the conflict. One of the major obstacles to meeting this demand has been..."

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